The Population and Poverty Research Network
We are a group of academic researchers and funders from around the globe studying the ways that population dynamics impact economies.
     
© Richard Lord.
© Richard Lord.© Allan G. Hill.© Richard Lord.© Allan G. Hill.
  
Network News

Video: Maternal Mortality in Gambia

Maternal mortality in Gambia is nearly 60 times higher than in Norway. A research collaboration between the University of Oslo and the Gambian healthcare system aims to halve it. Apollon, the award winning magazine from the University of Oslo, features a new video on Johanne Sundby's work addressing this issue.

Communicating Research to Policymakers: Researcers' Experiences

Despite increased investments in communication resources, researchers continue to encounter challenges in sharing their findings with policymakers. This new PopPov research brief addresses these challenges and highlights the experiences of four research teams who communicated findings from studies supported under the PopPov initiative.

You can find this and other research briefs on the PopPov Research Briefs page.

Hewlett Foundation Renews Support for PopPov Secretariat

This month the Population Reference Bureau will begin a new stage in its partnership with the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation's Population and Poverty Research Initiative. With renewed funding from the Hewlett Foundation, PRB will shift its focus outward from the PopPov Network to engage policy audiences with results from PopPov projects and related research and to build researchers' and advocates' capacity to communicate these results.

Read Hewlett Foundation's program officer Helena Choi's reflections on accomplishments of the initiative and future directions.

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Researcher News

"The economic consequences of AIDS mortality in South Africa," by Cally Ardington, will be published in the November 2014 Journal of Development Economics.

In "Climbing Down from the Ivory Tower," Nava Ashraf explains why it makes sense for field researchers to co-produce knowledge with the people they study and serve.

Timothy Powell Jackson published "Who benefits from free healthcare? Evidence from a randomized experiment in Ghana" in the March 2014 issue of the Journal of Development Economics.

A chapter by Anne Khasakhala appears in a new book, Vulnerabilities, Impacts, and Responses to HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Grace Kumchulesi speaks about the media as an effective communication tool for researchers.

Bouba Housseini co-authored an Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative brief "Africa's New Stories On Multidimensional Poverty."

Three PopPov researchers will contribute to the third edition of Disease Control Priorities:

Fafo researcher Tewodros Kebede contributed to several background papers in the Progressive Economy: European JustJobs Index.

Jed Friedman co-authored the discussion paper "Health Information, Treatment, and Worker Productivity: Experimental Evidence from Malaria Testing and Treatment among Nigerian Sugarcane Cutters."

J-PAL has posted a series of Maternal and Child Health Conference videos that feature work by PopPov-affiliated researchers.

David Lam delivered a keynote statement at the 47th session of the UN Commission on Population and Development.