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Demographic Change, Economic Growth, Income Distribution, and Poverty in Nigeria: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysisʺ

  • 2009-2011
  • Project
Nkang, Nkang M., University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Study: ʺDemographic Change, Economic Growth, Income Distribution, and Poverty in Nigeria: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysisʺ
PI(s): Nkang, Nkang M.
Affiliation(s): University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Institutional Partner(s): IIE
Project Dates:
Start: 2009
End: 2011
Data Source(s): 2006 Social Accounting Matrix, Household Data Survey data from 2004 Nigeria Living Standards Survey, 2006 Population and Demographic data from the National Population Commission.
Method(s): Simulation
Geographic Location(s): Nigeria

Description:
High unmet need for family planning, defined as women who are fecund and sexually active but not using contraception who do not want any more children or want to delay the next pregnancy, has been hypothesized to negatively affect economic growth by reducing per capita incomes and increasing the incidence of poverty. In contrast, demographic transition, driven by fertility reduction, promotes growth, and allows large amounts of human capital investments by households, with attendant distributional outcomes that reduce poverty. This research draws from the theory of demographic transition to study the impact of fertility changes and attendant health implications on economic growth, inequality, and poverty. The research addresses the need to evaluate the policy implications of fertility and poverty reduction by incorporating a computable general equilibrium model and household and demographic data.

Research Outputs:
Nkang, Nkang, Omonona, Bolarin, Yusuf, Suleiman & Oni, Omobowale (2012). Simulating the Impact of Exogenous Food Price Shock on Agriculture and the Poor in Nigeria: Results from a Computable General Equilibrium Model. Sustainable Agriculture Research. 1(2): 141-151. DOI: 10.5539/sar.v1n2p141

Nkang, M. Impact of Macroeconomic Shocks on Household Poverty and Income Inequality in Nigeria. Dissertation.

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