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Impact of Reproductive Health Services on Socioeconomic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: Connecting Evidence at Macro, Meso, and Micro-Level

  • 2008-2012
  • Project
Ruben, Ruerd, Radboud University Nijmegen; Muhimbili University

Study: “Impact of Reproductive Health Services on Socioeconomic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: Connecting Evidence at Macro, Meso, and Micro-Level”
PI(s): Ruben, Ruerd
Co-PI(s): Kamazima, Switbert; Longwe, Abiba; Westeneng, Judith; Mosha, Idda; Chitama, Dereck; Huisman, Janine; d’Exelle, Ben; Ketting, Evert; Kakoko, Deodatus
Affiliation(s): Radboud University Nijmegen; Muhimbili University
Institutional Partner(s): NWO/WOTRO
Project Dates:
Start: 2008
End: 2012
Data Source(s): Panel Data
Methods: Multilevel Analysis; IV Econometrics
Geographic Location(s): Sub-Saharan Africa, mainly northern Tanzania

Description:

Whereas knowledge regarding the operational design of reproductive health services is increasingly available, its impact on social and economic development is still poorly understood. This project and its five sub-projects analyze the relationships and interactions between reproductive health (RH) and poverty at the individual/household level, community level, and district level, relying on several data sources. Please click on the link to learn more on the subproject “Influence of Fertility and Household Composition on Female Labor Supply.” Special attention is given to RH shocks and the impact of availability and use of reproductive health services on individual/household poverty. The research relies on enriched DHS surveys, WB-LSMS panel data, and data collected specifically for this project, followed by a detailed assessment of the likelihood of changes in wealth status. Additional field research is carried out to assess the demand for and use of RH services as well as the supply of these services. The combined analyses provide new insights into how specific reproductive health services can reduce poverty incidence and generate evidence-based policy and program recommendations.

Research Outputs:

Chitama, Dereck, Baltussen, Rob, Ketting, Evert, Kamazima, Switbert, Nswilla, Anna & Mujinja, Phares G M. (2011). From Papers to Practices: District level priority setting processes and criteria for family planning, maternal, newborn and child health interventions in Tanzania. BMC Women’s Health, 11 (46). DOI: 10.1186/1472-6874-11-46.

Kakoko, Deodatus, Ketting, Evert, Kamazima, Switbert & Ruben, Ruerd. (2011). Provision of Family Planning Services in Tanzania: A Comparative Analysis of Public and Private Facilities. African Journal of Reproductive Health, 16 (4), 140-148. PMID: 23444551E.

Longwe, Abiba. (2013). Family Planning, Fertility Reduction and Economic Development in Africa (Doctoral dissertation). Radboud University Nijmegen.

Longwe, Abiba & Smits, Jeroen. (2013). The Impact of Family Planning on Primary School Enrolment in Sub-national Areas within 25 African Countries. African Journal of Reproductive Health, 17(2), 23-38.

Longwe, Abiba, Smits, Jeroen & de Jong, Eelke. (2013). Number and spacing of children and women’s employment in Africa (13-103). NiCE Working Paper.

Mosha, Idda. (2017). The Puzzle of Family Planning in Tanzania: A multi-method approach for understanding the use of family planning practices. Dissertation.

Mosha, Idda, Ruben, Ruerd & Kakoko, Deodatus. (2013). Family planning decisions, perceptions and gender dynamics among couples in Mwanza, Tanzania: a qualitative study. BMC Public Health, 13(523). DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-523

Mosha, Idda & Ruben, Ruerd. (2013). Communication, knowledge, social network and family planning utilization among couples in Mwanza, Tanzania: research article. African Journal of Reproductive Health, 17(3): 57-69.

van Rijsbergen, Bart & D’Exelle, Ben. (2011). Use of Delivery Care in Tanzania: The Importance of Poverty, Empowerment, and Emergency (University of East Anglia (UAE) Working Paper No. 33).

van Rijsbergen, Bart & D’Exelle, Ben. (2013). Delivery Care in Tanzania: A Comparative Analysis of Use and Preferences. World Development, 4(March), 276–287. DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2012.10.003

van Rijsbergen, Bart. (2012). Moedersterfte in Tanzania. Raffia (Institute for Gender Studies (IGS) of the Radboud University Nijmegen), 24(2), 8-10. ISSN: 15692051

Vyrastekova, Jana et al. (2014). Mothers More Altruistic than Fathers, but Only When Bearing Responsibility Alone: Evidence from Parental Choice Experiments in Tanzania. PLoS ONE, 9(6): e99952. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0099952

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