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Measuring the Impact of Young Adult Mortality on the Well-Being of Older Persons in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa

  • 2006-2008
  • Project
Opuni-Akuamoa, Marjorie, Johns Hopkins University

Study: “Measuring the Impact of Young Adult Mortality on the Well-Being of Older Persons in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa”
PI(s): Opuni-Akuamoa, Marjorie
Affiliation(s): Johns Hopkins University
Institutional Partner(s): PRB Dissertation Fellowship
Project Dates:
Start: 2006
End: 2008
Data Source(s): KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Survey (KIDS)
Methods: Ordered Probit, Fixed Effects
Geographic Location(s): South Africa

Description:
There has been an increase in young adult mortality in South Africa over the last 20 years. In KwaZulu-Natal, the probability of dying between ages 15 and 60 is 58 percent for women and 75 percent for men. The demographic consequences of these statistics include an increase in the number of orphans and bereaved parents. Additionally, ill health and mortality among adults of reproductive age (ages 15-54) can affect household income, labor allocations, consumption patterns, health and well-being of household members, and ability to care for older adults. Using the KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Survey (KIDS), which includes detailed socioeconomic information by household, the researcher has three specific aims to: assess whether the occurrence of a young adult death affects the probabilities of not working, working part-time, and working full time for nonpensionable older women (ages 50-59) and nonpensionable men (ages 50-64); to assess if the occurrence of a young adult death is associated with the value of assets households where persons ages 50 years and older live; and to examine if the occurrence of a young adult death affects the self-reported health status of persons ages 50 years and older.

Research Outputs:
Bishai D, Opuni M. (2009). Are infant mortality rate declines exponential? The general pattern of 20th century infant mortality rate decline. Population Health Metrics. 7:13. DOI: 10.1186/1478-7954-7-13

Opuni, M., Bishai, D., Gray, G. E., McIntyre, J. A., & Martinson, N. A. (2010). Preferences for characteristics of antiretroviral therapy provision in Johannesburg, South Africa: results of a
conjoint analysis. AIDS and Behavior,14(4), 807-815. DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9584-4

Opuni, M., Peterman, A., & Bishai, D. (2011). Inequality in prime‐age adult deaths in a high AIDS mortality setting: does the measure of economic status matter?. Health economics, 20(11), 1298-1311. DOI: 10.1002/hec.1671


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